Child cancer day care patients move to hospice to free up Royal Stoke resources



Children with cancer may receive their treatment at the Donna Louise Hospice to free up beds and resources at the Royal Stoke for coronavirus patients.

Children’s oncology daycases are being moved to the hospice along with clinical nurse specialists and a consultant-led service. The change came into force yesterday.

A UHNM spokesman said the move is to ensure risks to its young patients are kept to an absolute minimum.

He said: “As the country’s Chief Medical Officer has stated, routine NHS services will inevitably come under pressure as the coronavirus spreads. The NHS has well-established escalation protocols to respond to situations such as this and UHNM has been advised on what steps we can take at a local level.

“As well as following national guidance, we have plans in place to ensure all staff and patients are kept safe.” 

He added: “The public can also play their part in reducing the risks by following health advice, including washing their hands and covering their mouths when they cough or sneeze.

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“If anyone has a temperature and a new cough, they should stay at home for fourteen days. If the symptoms don’t improve after seven days they should call 111.”

Dot Gillespie, Director of Care at the Donna Louise, confirmed that in-patients are not being moved from the Royal Stoke but that child oncology day case provision has moved to the hospice.

She said: “We work in very close partnership with the oncology team. We all support the same families. It’s great to be able to help in the current situation in any way we can.”

She added: “It’s a very scary thing for families to take their sick children to the hospital where there are some very sick people being treated. We’re a safe haven for them.”

Simon Fuller, Chief Executive of the Donna Louise, said: “It’s been nice to see new faces at the Donna Louise as we welcome nurses from UHNM who will be delivering children’s chemotherapy at the hospice for a while. It’s great to help out our NHS partners.”





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